Category Archives: United States

UM Museum Opens Photography Exhibit of Buddhist Caves

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The exhibit “Dunhuang through the Lens of James and Lucy Lo” is now open at the UM Museum.

Images from China illustrate artistic and architectural achievements

JANUARY 16, 2017 BY CHRISTINA STEUBE

OXFORD, Miss. – Photographs of the intricately painted Mogao and Yulin Caves in Dunhuang, China are on exhibit at the University of Mississippi Museum.

“Dunhuang Through the Lens of James and Lucy Lo” features photographs taken of the caves by the Los in the 1940s. The nearly 500 caves containing artwork are in the northwestern area of China along the ancient Silk Road and are a major Buddhist pilgrimage site. The caves, which served as spaces for meditation and worship, were painted between the fourth and 14th centuries.
The exhibit opened Jan. 10 in conjunction with the Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies, held on the UM campus Jan. 13-15. The free exhibit runs through April 29, and an opening reception is set for 6-8 p.m. Jan. 31.

Joshua Howard, Croft associate professor of history and international studies and a Chinese historian, proposed this exhibit to the University Museum.

“These photographs have high artistic value,” Howard said. “James and Lucy Lo used natural light and often placed mirrors in the caves to create special lighting effects and create a sense of the caves’ spirituality.

“James Lo also experimented with his photo angles; for instance, shooting a 50-foot reclining Buddha from the vantage point of the head of the statue rather than from the feet looking toward the head. The result is a more intimate and serene shot of the Buddha. Other landscape photos they took give a sense of the harsh but beautiful desert terrain the caves inhabit.”
The collection of 31 black-and-white photographs is from the Lo Archive and the P.Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Center for East Asian Art at Princeton University. The Mogao and Yulin caves illustrate artistic and architectural achievements, as well as provide an intimate look at the history of Buddhism and other religions of the region.

Museum officials were excited about the opportunity to open the exhibit to conference attendees, said Robert Saarnio, museum director. The conference included workshops, panel discussions, lectures and film screenings of Asian poetry and literature, history, language, art, philosophy and politics.

“These are exactly the kinds of multidisciplinary and cross-campus partnerships that the museum seeks to foster and welcome, wherein great art and artifact content can be exhibited in such close correspondence to curricular, research and teaching endeavors,” Saarnio said.
The museum, at the corner of University Avenue and Fifth Street, is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

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Secrets of Buddhist Art: Tibet, Japan, and Korea at the Frist

February 10 – May 7, 2017
Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee

Jijang Bosal (Bodhisattva Kshitigarbha) and the Kings of Hell, Korea, late 19th or early 20th century, late Joseon Period (1392–1912). Colors and cloth. Newark Museum, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John P. Lyden, 2001, 2001.75.1

Jijang Bosal (Bodhisattva Kshitigarbha) and the Kings of Hell, Korea, late 19th or early 20th century, late Joseon Period (1392–1912). Colors and cloth. Newark Museum, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John P. Lyden, 2001, 2001.75.1

Related Programs
One-Day Educator Workshop: Secrets of Buddhist Art Thu, Feb 16, 2017
Tibet, Japan, and Korea all practice a form of esoteric or “secret” Buddhism. Called Vajrayana Buddhism, this form utilizes works of art that reveal a complex array of both human and divine figures. This exhibition showcases superlative works from the Newark Museum’s first-rate collection and will make its first appearance at the Frist Center, introducing a general audience to the dazzling aesthetics of Buddhist art and providing a basic understanding of these objects’ function within Buddhist practice.

This exhibition was organized by the Newark Museum.

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Met, Ministry of Culture renew MoU

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Asian Tribune
Prakash M Swamy in New York
New York, 02 October, (Asiantribune.com):

Thomas P. Campbell, Director and CEO of The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that The Met and the Ministry of Culture of the Government of India have reaffirmed their long-term cooperative relationship through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which renews for five additional years the two-way partnerships for sharing knowledge and expertise that have been established between the Museum and cultural institutions in India. The MOU was signed in June by Shefali Shah, Joint Secretary of the Ministry of Culture, and Mr. Campbell.

Through the agreement, the Ministry of Culture and The Met will continue to cooperate in the areas of conservation, exhibitions, academic research, information-sharing, public education, publications, museum management, and short- and long-term loans.

“This agreement is a wide-ranging reaffirmation of The Met’s close relationship with India and its rich cultural heritage,” said Mr. Campbell. “The Indian Conservation Fellowship Program, in particular, has forged important professional relationships between colleagues internationally and has provided critical experience that can be built upon in the future. By generously continuing its support of this program, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has once again demonstrated its commitment to providing educational support for museum professionals around the world.” Continue reading

THE PRICE COLLECTION: THE BUDDHA AND THE FLOATING WORLD

1472255680231JAPANESE AMERICAN CULTURAL & COMMUNITY CENTER
Los Angeles, CA

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 – SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2016

This extraordinary exhibition was envisioned by world-renowned collectors, Etsuko and Joe Price. It features silk scroll paintings depicting the everyday life of the Edo period (1615–1868) and divine images from the Buddhist world with an ikebana flower arrangement installation by three ikebana schools – Ikenobo, Ohara-Ryu, and Sogetsu School.

FORCE OF STILLNESS at the Rubin Museum (NYC)

master__detail_carouselFORCE OF STILLNESS
FILM AND PERFORMANCE INSPIRED BY BUDDHISM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, AND SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Rubin Museum of Art

Force of Stillness is a two-day festival bringing together a prominent group of international artists to highlight the significant influence of Buddhism on contemporary art.

The festival presents experimental films and performances that facilitate and transmit a complex range of meditative experiences while addressing topics such as visual colonization, queer performativity, alternate experiences of temporality, and experiments with meditative gestures in public.

Force of Stillness is curated by Amber Bemak

About the Artists

Amber Bemak teaches filmmaking at Southern Methodist University, and her creative work is based in experimental and documentary film, performance art, and curatorial practice. Bemak’s work focuses on the themes of Buddhist culture, performative explorations of the body in relation to political systems, and cross-cultural encounters in the context of globalization. Her feature and short films have played in numerous festivals internationally and have been seen at venues that include the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, SculptureCenter, and the European Media Art Festival. She has taught film theory and practice in India, Nepal, Kenya, Mexico, and the United States.

Vanessa Anspaugh is a choreographer and performance-based artist. Many of the questions that surround her work address the myriad relationships that exist in collections of groups and individuals, touching on tropes such as directorship, authorship, collaboration, collectivity, domination, emptiness, and love. Her work has been both commissioned and presented by Danspace Project, DTW, New York Live Arts, the Joyce Theater, the River to River Festival, BAX, the Sculpture Center, the Hessel Museum of Art, and Movement Research among others. She has had funded residencies through DTW, Mount Tremper Arts, Kattsbaan, the Mac Dowell Colony, LMCC, BAX, BOFFO, and Bard College. Continue reading

Japanese Painting: From the Zen Mind

ma-842259At the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
June 11, 2016–December 18, 2016

Japanese Painting: From the Zen Mind explores various approaches to Zen subjects, from the teachings of Zen and the experience of enlightenment to personal interpretations of Zen masters or paragons. The practice of Zen consists of meditation and direct transmission of knowledge from teacher to pupil, leading through personal effort toward enlightenment. As an active, participatory religion based on discipline, it appealed to military government leaders and others of similar mindset in Japan from the 13th century forward. The main practitioners of this genre of painting were enlightened monks, who were asked by their followers to create a work of calligraphy or painting that was often displayed for the practice of tea. Professional artists were also drawn to Zen ideals. The paintings and calligraphies in the exhibition, dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries, demonstrate how the experience of the artist produces different qualities in their painting.

This exhibition is included in General Admission.

BAM’s Buddha and lots more at Asia Week

 A monumental gilt bronze� Buddha from 14th Tibet is on view in the exhibition "Buddhist Art from the Roof of the World" at the Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy BAMPFA. Photo: BAMPFA Photo: BAMPFA

A monumental gilt bronze� Buddha from 14th Tibet is on view in the exhibition “Buddhist Art from the Roof of the World” at the Berkeley Art Museum. Courtesy BAMPFA. Photo: BAMPFA
Photo: BAMPFA

San Francisco Chronicle, By Jesse Hamlin, September 21, 2016

Julia White was standing in a gallery at the Berkeley Art Museum the other day, gazing up at a monumental gilt-bronze Buddha made by master Tibetan craftsmen in the 14th century.

The blue-haired Buddha exudes an aura of deep tranquillity, the fingers of his right hand turned downward in the mudra, or gesture, of touching the Earth and “calling it to witness his readiness to enter the state of enlightenment,” says White, the museum’s senior curator for Asian art, who made this rare sculpture the centerpiece of the intimate exhibition “Buddhist Art From the Roof of the World,” on view through Nov. 27.

Composed of 30 exquisite sculptures and thangka paintings from Tibet and Nepal, the show is one of many exhibitions, lectures, film screenings and performances taking place during Asia Week San Francisco Bay Area, Friday, Sept. 30-Oct. 8, a celebration of Asian art and culture involving dozens of organizations, from the Japanese American Museum of San Jose to the Mongolia Foundation to the Society for Art & Cultural Heritage of India.

The ancient Buddhist art in Berkeley, created as objects for spiritual devotion, is drawn from a major private collection owned by an anonymous patron who has loaned it long term to the university museum. White kept the show small so she could leave space around each object and let the gallery itself breathe. Continue reading