Category Archives: Uncategorized

25 historical sites identified for inclusion in VUDA Master Plan

The Hindu, October 31, 2016
B. MADHU GOPAL

The Department of Archaeology and Museums has identified 25 archaeologically important sites in the three districts of Srikakulam, Vizianagaram and Visakhapatnam for inclusion in the VUDA (Visakhapatnam Urban Development Authority) Master Plan 2030.

The sites identified will be provided with basic amenities for tourists, roads, other infrastructure faculties.

The identification of archaeologically important sites in East Godavari district, which also comes under VUDA, will be done by the Kakinada-based Department of Archaeology and Museums.

Ancient Hindu temples, Buddhist heritage sites and Jain caves in Srikakulam and Vizianagaram, a megalithic burial site, Chalukyan temples, war memorials, a Dutch building and a 17th century Jama Masjid were among the historical sites identified for inclusion in the Master Plan 2030.

“We have identified 25 heritage sites in the three north Andhra districts and we will submit the list to VUDA in the next few days,” Assistant Director of Archaeology and Museums Chittibabu told The Hindu.

The district-wise sites identified are: Visakhapatnam – Appikonda temple.

The only shore temple dedicated to Lord Siva in AP, the group of three temples with five natural springs at Panchadharla near Elamanchili, the Buddhist heritage sites at Pavuralakonda, Thotlakonda and Bhavikonda, the temple of Sri Varaha Lakshmi Nrusimha Swamy at Simhachalam, the war memorial of Sri Krishna Deva Raya at Padmanabham and the pillar at Potnuru.

Vizianagaram – Ramatheertham, Neelavathi (Buddhist site), Jayathi temple, Eastern Chalukyan temple (20 km from Gajapathinagaram) and the Bobbili war memorial.

Srikakulam – Dutch building, Jama Masjid (17th century), Arasavilli and Sri Kurmam temples, Salihundam and Kalingapatnam (Buddhist sites) and Sri Mukhalingam temple.

The main objective of the whole exercise is to integrate the erstwhile Visakhapatnam Metropolitan Region (VMR) and plans prepared with the extended VMR with the Master Plan for the Visakhapatnam-Kakinada PCPIR region.

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San Francisco: Buddhist Cosmology: A Visual History of Enlightenment

January 10, 2017 at Against The Stream: San Francisco in San Francisco.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER AND LEARN MORE

Buddhist Cosmology: A Visual History of Enlightenment
A four-week class series with Michael Owens
Tuesdays, beginning January 10th
7:30-9pm
San Francisco

Cosmology is perhaps the oldest and broadest of the sciences because it explores the very extent and limits of reality – from the macrocosm of the size and age of the Universe to the microcosm of the smallest known particles. This class is a general introduction to Buddhist Cosmology based on a survey of Buddhist art and iconography from India, Central Asia, China and Japan. Each nights’ class includes a dynamic slide-show presentation of works of art that exemplify different aspects of Buddhist cosmological thinking.

Open to all.

Cost: $80 ($20 per class) or $70 if paid in advance. There will be an opportunity to offer dana to the teacher at each class (teachers receive a portion of the reg fee and are supported by dana). Some scholarships and work-study are available. No one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Michael Owens is a writer and teacher working at the convergence of art, education and philosophy. After exploring an academic career in Buddhist Studies at Princeton University, he began teaching meditation and giving lectures at Buddhist temples and monasteries domestically and abroad. In 2006 he founded the Red Lotus Society, an educational non-profit organization to promote meditation as an inter-faith practice. Michael has translated several Chinese Buddhist texts into English and teaches regularly on Buddhist history and philosophy.

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4th International conference and dhamma yatra : *Ancient Buddhism * April 8-9, 2017 Lalitpur & Devgarah, India

Continue reading

Homer, Alaska Author Publishes Buddhist Novel

Homer, Alaska October 27, 2016 Entertainment News
(PRLEAP.COM) October 27, 2016 – Saved by the Light, a new book by Lela Ryterski, has been released by RoseDog Books.

Saved by the Light is a story about the samurai warrior, Shijo Kingo, and the Buddhist monk, Nichiren Daishonin. Nichiren is a rebel. Shijo Kingo is quick-tempered and, like most of us, has an inherent sense of what’s right and what’s wrong. He becomes Nichiren’s pupil and learns to chant a powerful invocation that can bring peace to the world. Because Nichiren refutes the main religions of his day and teaches the chant, he is almost killed and is exiled. However, the key to his victory lies in that very same chant. This is a true story of amazing events that saved Nichiren’s life.

There are now more than 12 million practitioners of Nichiren Buddhism worldwide as a world peace movement. It is the fastest growing sect of Buddhism in modern times.

About the Author:
Lela Ryterski encountered Nichiren Buddhism through the lay Buddhist organization, now called the SGI (Soka Gakkai International) in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York, in 1985. Over the years she transformed her life from sad to happy because of the practice and overcame many challenges. She studied art from an early age and became a teacher and artist. She has previously illustrated a coloring book by Helga Wagenleiter and Chirpee the Squirrel by Alice Oates.

Lela practices chanting and yoga. She currently resides in a yurt in Homer, Alaska.

Saved by the Light is a 30-page paperback with a retail price of $16.00. The ISBN is 978-1-4809-6690-1. It was published by RoseDog Books of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. For more information, or to request a review copy, please go to our virtual pressroom at www.dorrancepressroom.com or our online bookstore at www.rosedogbookstore.com.
CONTACT INFORMATION
Jessica Stillwell
RoseDog Books

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Nepal’s most popular Buddhist nun is a musical rock star

d9171742e5174a7d9ea903c07c198615Yahoo News
BINAJ GURUBACHARYA BINAJ GURUBACHARYA
October 13, 2016

KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — There is one Buddhist nun everyone in Nepal knows by name — not because she’s a religious icon and a UNICEF goodwill ambassador, nor for her work running a girl’s school and a hospital for kidney patients.

Ani Choying Drolma is famous as one of the country’s biggest pop stars.

With more than 12 albums of melodious Nepali tunes and Tibetan hymns that highlight themes of peace and harmony, the songstress in saffron robes has won hearts across the Himalayan nation and abroad.

“I am totally against the conservative, conventional idea of a Buddhist nun,” the 45-year-old nun said. Some people “think a Buddhist nun should be someone who does not come out in the media so much, who is isolated … always in a monastery, always shy. But I don’t believe in that.”

Neither do her fans, who greet her with a roar of applause whenever she walks out on stage, and fall silent as she closes her eyes to sing.

“Every time I get frustrated with life or get angry, I just listen to Ani’s music and I calm down,” said one fan, Sunil Tuladhar. “She is my music goddess.”

But with a career deviating sharply from what conservatives in Nepal believe to be the proper path of a Buddhist, she’s caught criticism as well. One Buddhist monk at the famed Swayambhu Shrine questioned how she can reconcile the simple life of a religious ascetic with the fame and wealth she’s amassed over her two-decade musical career.

“How can a nun be making money by selling her voice, living a luxurious life and yet claim she is a nun?” Surya Shakya asked. Continue reading

Exploring China’s new frontier e

Reporter: Han Bin 丨 CCTV.com

10-12-2016 13:01 BJT

The Ancient Silk Road was not only a trade route, but also a corridor for ideas to flow.

Today in the Uygur Autonomous Region, the major religion is Islam. Prior to the arrival of Islam, it was Buddhism. One of the greatest legacies from that time is the murals, in the Grottoes of Qiuci, another name for the ancient kingdom of Kucha. 

In today’s episode, reporter Han Bin takes us to see the paintings and what’s being done to restore them.

Entering an ancient kingdom, the paintings reveal a lost oasis on the Silk Road. For the past 18 years, Ye Mei has been investigating their secrets.

“I’ve always been curious to study how murals drawn some 2,000 years ago, have survived to this day. How can we better protect them to extend their survival in the future?” said Ye Mei, director of Institute of Qiuci Grottoes Protection.

Ye Mei told us the grottoes house the cultural achievements of the region’s ancient ethnic groups.

They show that ancient civilization was built on the integration of the dominant Buddhist culture with several other religious cultures.

The murals are rich and diverse in content. But time and the elements have taken their toll. And the actual number of grottoes and murals is still a mystery.

Ye said, “Qiuci was a very inclusive and prosperous society. It was a key hub of the ancient Silk Road, a key melting pot for different cultures. These characteristics are fully reflected in the paintings. Like this figure: he’s a high-ranking nobleman, with short hair, a half-length robe, and a small sword.”

For a long time, Qiuci was the most populous oasis in the Tarim Basin. The Qiuci Grottoes are the most famous Buddhist art site in Xinjiang. The influence of the different civilizations from the West and the East were profound. The glory enjoyed over one thousand years ago still lingers today. Continue reading

The Buddha: exhibition at the Tropenmuseum in

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19_ DE BOEDDHA-Van levensverhaal tot inspiratiebron_ Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden_12 febr. tm 14 aug. 2016

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10_ DE BOEDDHA-Van levensverhaal tot inspiratiebron_ Museum Volkenkunde, Leiden_12 febr. tm 14 aug. 2016

[from Museum website]

23 september 2016 until January 2017

A life story and a source of inspiration
Do you have a Buddha at home? What do you know about Buddhism?

Buddhism is hugely popular. The Netherlands alone has around 500 Buddhist centres. What makes the life story of this spiritual leader so intriguing? Why do we all fall for the portrait of the Buddha? And what do we actually know about this icon?

Do you have a Buddha at home?
What do you know about Buddhism?
Discover how Buddhism is experienced worldwide. Join us on a journey through centuries-old Chinese monasteries and to the Buddha’s birthplace in Nepal, to the Indonesian Borobudur and the so-called Tulip Buddhism in the Netherlands.

There have never been so many Buddha statues in the Tropenmuseum before. With the help of 100 Buddha statues, including unique international top items, you’ll follow the life story of one of the most inspiring figures in world history.

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