Category Archives: England

India-UK sign MoU to enhance cultural cooperation

Shripad Naik, India’s minister of state for culture and Sajid Javed, UK’s secretary in the department of culture, media and sport signed the memorandum of understanding in New Delhi on Wednesday. Photo: PTI

Shripad Naik, India’s minister of state for culture and Sajid Javed, UK’s secretary in the department of culture, media and sport signed the memorandum of understanding in New Delhi on Wednesday. Photo: PTI

The two countries will collaborate in museums, libraries, archaeology, performing arts, capacity building programs and skill development

Moulishree Srivastava

New Delhi: India and the UK on Wednesday agreed to enhance cultural cooperation over a period of five years. The two countries will collaborate in museums, libraries, archaeology, performing arts, capacity building programs, skill development, joint publications, archives, cinematography and literature.

Shripad Naik, India’s minister of state for culture and Sajid Javed, UK’s secretary in the department of culture, media and sport signed the memorandum of understanding in New Delhi on Wednesday. Under the partnership, both governments will develop conservation policies, apply conservation techniques and training, digitize and improve records management practices and conserve built heritage, besides forming a collaboration between Indian National Museum and the British Museum, the ministry of culture said in a statement.

The agreement also includes preservation of monuments and Buddhist heritage, infrastructure development at archaeological sites and enhanced people-to-people contact through festivals of India abroad. The alliance also seeks to promote tourism, improve records management in government as well as give a boost to the National Mission on Manuscripts, an autonomous organization under the ministry of culture, which was established in 2003 to survey, locate and conserve Indian manuscripts.

[link]

BUDDHIST ART COURSE

BUDDHIST ART COURSE
Taught by internationally renowned
N.K.T. Buddhist artist Kadam Chris Heyes.

When: Sunday , October 5th at 10.30 am – 5.00pm
Where: Kadampa Meditation Center, 17 Guildhall Lane, Leicester LE1 5FQ
01162620317
Cost: £25 inc.vegetarian lunch | Free to full members

No experience needed, just a willingness to learn!

Study the techniques and gain practical experience of drawing Buddha’s face, following the sacred proportions of Buddhist art.

[link]

Buddha’s Word: The Life of Books in Tibet and Beyond

1935_website28 May 2014 – 17 January 2015
Li Ka Shing Gallery

Buddha’s Word is the first museum exhibition of Tibetan material in Cambridge. It is also the first time in the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology’s history that its Buddhist collections will be showcased in an exhibition.

Developed in partnership with the Mongolia and Inner Asia Research Unit and with support from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Frederick Williamson Memorial Fund, Buddha’s Word brings together collections and research from three of the University of Cambridge Museums – the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences and the Fitzwilliam Museum – as well as the University Library and Emmanuel and Pembroke Colleges.

A printing block for prayer flag (lunta, rlung rta), used to print the prayer flag with an image of a wind horse © Donated by A.F. Schofield, University Librarian

A printing block for prayer flag (lunta, rlung rta), used to print the prayer flag with an image of a wind horse
© Donated by A.F. Schofield, University Librarian

 

Many of the artefacts, prints and manuscripts in the exhibition have never been on public display before. Exhibits include some of the oldest illuminated Buddhist manuscripts from the first decades of the eleventh century as well as specimens of skilfully illuminated wooden covers; a quartet of scroll paintings brought back from the infamous Younghusband Expedition; and a gift from the 13th Dalai Lama. Continue reading

New MA in Buddhist Studies at SOAS

The new “MA Buddhist Studies” at SOAS has been granted final approval and will start this September.
This new MA will benefit from the school members’ rich combination of expertise in Buddhist traditions and languages. It will be organized around a core course, “Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies” that will be co-taught by the four key Buddhist scholars in the Department of the Study of Religions, namely Lucia Dolce, Ulrich Pagel, Antonello Palumbo, and  Vincent Tournier.
You can find more information on this programme, its structure and our course offer at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions/programmes/ma-buddhist-studies/
The recent appointment of colleagues working on Buddhist Art in Tibet and South East Asia, thanks to the endowment by the Alphawood foundation, will considerably enrich the school’s offer. Indeed, we believe that an auspicious period for Buddhist studies at SOAS is ahead of us.

The Diamond Sutra on display: Text panel 1

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From the International Dunhuang Project’s blog

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2014

The whole text of the earliest dated printed book — the Diamond Sutra — will be on display at the British Library for the first time over a period of eighteen months between March 2014 – August 2015.

Following extensive conservation, the Diamond Sutra scroll currently remains in separate panels giving the unique opportunity to show all the panels in turn (see timetable below). Each panel will be on display for two months in the Sir John Ritblat Gallery at the British Library, open to all and with free admission. Each panel will then be shown in turn, remaining on display for two months. The frontispiece will be shown again for the final display in July and August 2015.

The display also includes a copy of a Chinese almanac printed just a decade later, in AD 877, and two pages from a printed copy of the Heart Sutra in Sanskrit with a phonetic transcription in Chinese, an early example of Korean printing using moveable type and the earliest examples of Japanese printing, the Million Charms of Empress Shotoku. See this earlier post for more information on these.

The first text panel of the Diamond Sutra on display (May–June 2014) contains the opening six sections of the Diamond Sutra.

See the whole of the Diamond Sutra online on the IDP website.

The following English translation of the first panel (by Lapiz Lazuli Texts) is based on Kumārajīva’s Chinese translation of the original Sanskrit:

1. The cause of the Dharma assembly
Thus have I heard. At one time the Buddha was in Śrāvastī, residing in the Jeta Grove, in Anāthapiṇḍada’s park, along with a great saṃgha of bhikṣus, twelve hundred and fifty in all. At mealtime, the Bhagavān put on his robe, picked up his bowl, and made his way into the great city of Śrāvastī to beg for food within the city walls. After he had finished begging sequentially from door to door, he returned and ate his meal. Then he put away his robe and bowl, washed his feet, arranged his seat, and sat down.

2. Elder Subhūti opens the question
From the midst of the great multitude, Elder Subhūti then arose from his seat, bared his right shoulder, and knelt with his right knee to the ground. With his hands joined together in respect, he addressed the Buddha, saying, “How extraordinary, Bhagavān, is the manner in which the Tathāgata is skillfully mindful of the bodhisattvas, and skillfully instructs and cares for the bodhisattvas! Bhagavān, when good men and good women wish to develop the mind of Anuttarā Samyaksaṃbodhi, how should their minds dwell? How should they pacify their minds?” The Buddha replied, “Excellent, excellent, Subhūti, for it is just as you have said: the Tathāgata is skillfully mindful of the bodhisattvas, and skillfully instructs and cares for the bodhisattvas. Now listen carefully, because your question will be answered. Good men and good women who wish to develop the mind of Anuttarā Samyaksaṃbodhi should dwell thusly, and should pacify their minds thusly.” “Just so, Bhagavān. We are joyfully wishing to hear it.” Continue reading

Buddhist artefacts to go on display for Cambridge’s first Tibetan exhibition

Cambridge News
LIZZY BUCHAN
13 May 2014

X-ray of a Buddha kyamuni's statue in bronze (MAA, 1935.346).Tibet. 14th centuryPurchased by Louis C.G. Clarke.Courtesy of the Hamilton Kerr Institute and the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge.

X-ray of a Buddha kyamuni’s statue in bronze (MAA, 1935.346).Tibet. 14th centuryPurchased by Louis C.G. Clarke.Courtesy of the Hamilton Kerr Institute and the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge.

Some of the world’s oldest Buddhist manuscripts dating back to the eleventh century will go on display for the first time in Cambridge.

Historians, anthropologists, linguists, art historians, and scientists have contributed to ‘Buddha’s Word: The Life of Books in Tibet and Beyond’, which will go on show at Cambridge’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology from May 28.

Visitors will be able to follow the journey of Buddha’s words in three different spaces within the Li Ka Shing gallery of the museum.

First to greet visitors will be a Himalayan Buddhist Altar which demonstrates an exploration of the text as sacred object, as a relic of the Buddha.

Continue reading

100 years ago: ‘Wonders of the East’: Stein Exhibition in the British Museum Extension

Stein Photo 28/7(4), Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Stein Photo 28/7(4), Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

The blog of the International Dunhuang Project describes the exhibition of items (photographs, paintings, books, and others) from Aurel Stein’s early 20th century expeditions to Central Asia. ‘Wonders of the East’: Stein Exhibition in the British Museum Extension, which opened on 7 May 1914, was “designed to show the most valuable results of the second journey of archaeological and geographical investigation carried out by Sir Marc Aurel Stein, K.C.I.E, in Chinese Turkestan and the adjoining western border of China, under the joint auspices of the Government of India and the Trustees of the British Museum.”

I see dead people: Mancunian Buddhist reveals grisly corpse encounters for photo book – graphic image warning

Mancunian Matters
Helen Le Caplain
18 Mar 2014

Warning: graphic images after the jump.

“The worst one I came across was a body, found in the basement of a Berlin building at 5 o’clock in the morning, wrapped in a blanket which was leaking out like a sponge.

“The smell was really bad.”

This was the stomach-churning response 50-year-old Buddhist and Manchester Metropolitan University lecturer Sue Fox gave when asked about the worst corpse encounter she experienced a few years ago.

But this isn’t the only meeting mum-of-one Sue has had with the dead.

The media lecturer gained unprecedented access to Manchester hospital autopsies, mortuaries and crematoria over the course of four years to take haunting ‘taboo’ pictures of the dead for her book Post Mortem. Continue reading

Aurel Stein: A hundred years on

Here is a Pinterest page with images from the exhibition at the Royal Geographical Society, London. 6 January – 14 February 2014. All the images from the exhibition can be seen online.

Tibetan skeletal dancers make no bones about it

Buddhist monks from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Tibet chant with traditional drums during ‘Wisdom and Insight’ at St John the Evangelist Church in Iffley Road, Oxford. Picture: OX63326 Ric Mellis

Buddhist monks from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Tibet chant with traditional drums during ‘Wisdom and Insight’ at St John the Evangelist Church in Iffley Road, Oxford. Picture: OX63326 Ric Mellis

Oxford Mail
11:00am Monday 11th November 2013 in News

SKELETAL dancers have helped bring a spectacular end to a week’s residency in Oxford for a group of exiled Tibetan Buddhist monks.

The monks, who are from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Tibet, have been showing off their culture and traditions at the Pitt Rivers Museum since Tuesday.

On Saturday night, they performed a dance at St John the Evangelist Church in Iffley Road, Oxford. Continue reading