Category Archives: Academia

Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Society, Launceston hosts Tibetan expert Zara Fleming Lucy Stone

Lucy Stone
18 Apr 2017, 5 p.m.

One of the world’s most senior specialists in Buddhist art and Central Asian history will be speaking in Launceston in May.

Zara Fleming, from the United Kingdom, is an art historian, curator and lecturer on the art and culture of Tibet, Mongolia and the Himalayas. Speaking as a guest of the Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Society, Launceston branch, Ms Fleming will give an overview of Tibetan history from the foundation of the Tibetan Empire in the sixth century to the present day.

She will also explore the art and culture inspired by Buddhism, introduced from India in the seventh century, and provide insight into the political reality of life in Tibet now.

Ms Fleming will speak at an upcoming lecture at the Sir Raymond Ferrall Centre at the University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus on Tuesday, May 9, starting at 6pm.

Tickets to the lecture are $30 including refreshments. For more details visit www.adfas.org.au/societies/tasmania/launceston/ or email launceston@adfas.org.au.

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Goldberg Lecturer to examine duplication in Chinese sculpture

Buddha, gilt bronze, dated 537, Eastern Wei Dynasty, h. 22 cm, Berenson Art Collection, Villa I Tatti – The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies.

Vanderbilt News, by Ann Marie Deer Owens | Mar. 20, 2017, 9:45 AM

Duke University’s Stanley Abe will discuss duplication in Chinese sculpture March 23 at Cohen Hall

The study of duplication in Chinese sculpture from ancient times to the present is the focus of a lecture by Stanley Abe at Vanderbilt’s Cohen Hall March 23.

Abe, associate professor of art and art history at Duke University, will deliver the Norman L. and Roselea J. Goldberg Lecture in Art History at 4:10 p.m. in Room 203. A reception in the Cohen atrium will follow Abe’s talk.

“In China, identical sets of figures, serial images, replications in archaic styles, and later copies were produced over a long period of time,” Abe said. “New works were provided with ancient inscriptions; old objects could be inscribed anew. In modern times, forgeries meant to deceive collectors proliferated.”

Abe has published on Chinese Buddhist art, contemporary Chinese art, Asian American art, abstract expressionism and the collecting of Chinese sculpture. He is now writing a narrative account of how Chinese sculpture came into existence as a category of “fine art” during the late-19th and early-20th centuries.

“The study of duplication suggests a way to understand the history of Chinese sculpture as more than a series of unique masterpieces,” Abe said. “However, attention to duplication raises many questions and issues for further study.”

Abe received the Shimada Prize for Ordinary Images (University of Chicago Press, 2002), a richly illustrated book that explores the large body of sculpture, paintings and other religious imagery produced for China’s common classes from the third to the sixth centuries CE. The Shimada Prize is awarded for distinguished scholarship in the history of East Asian art by the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and by The Metropolitan Center for Far Eastern Art Studies in Kyoto, Japan.

Sponsored by the Department of History of Art, the Goldberg Lecture is free and open to the public. Parking is available in Lot 95 outside of Cohen Hall. For more information, call the department at 615-322-2831.

Fay Renardson contributed to this story.

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Faculty Voices: Where India and China Meet

2-280x173Where India and China Meet: Buddhist Art Exhibition in Palace Museum, Beijing

By Jinah Kim, Gardner Cowles Associate Professor of History of Art and Architecture, Harvard University

Kim received a SAI Faculty Grant for her research on Indian painting.

A first major loan exhibition of Indian art in Beijing, China is currently held in the majestic Meridian gate tower of the Palace Museum (September 28, 2016- January 3 2017) of the Forbidden City (see a virtual tour of the exhibition here.) “Across the Silk Road: Gupta Sculptures and their Chinese Counterparts during 400 to 700CE” is an ambitious exhibition conceived by the senior curatorial fellow of the Palace Museum, Dr. Lou Wenhua, after his visit to India over 3 years ago. Fifty-six sculptures from nine Indian Museums are on display against a red backdrop in one gallery, while two adjacent galleries are filled with over one hundred Chinese Buddhist sculptures against blue backdrop. Bringing this exhibition together is an impressive feat by the organizers in Beijing, which, of course, was not possible without collaborative efforts from many museum personnel and officers in India.

When the China-India bilateral relationship is not as rosy and warm as anticipated (i.e. India’s failed entry into the NSG at the Seoul plenary, CPEC [China Pakistan Economic Corridor] developments—part of President Xie Jinping’s Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st Maritime Silk Road projects), the exhibition reminds us of the age old connections between the two countries, notably activated and solidified through the transmission of Buddhism. It also opens up new possibilities of trans-regional connections for the future that may benefit tremendously from mutual understanding of each other’s culture and history.

The time frame of the exhibition, from 400 to 700CE, is the period in which three Chinese monk-pilgrims to India, Faxian (337-c.422CE), Xuanzang (602-664CE) and Yijing (635-713CE), visited India. Their travelogues are enthusiastically mined as indispensable records for understanding the history of Indian Buddhism and the history of early medieval India, at times unfortunately without any critical consideration of the Chinese monks’ own cultural prejudices and political motivations. The exhibition heralds “Gupta sculptures” as its main anchor perhaps unwittingly perpetuating a notion of the Gupta period (Gupta dynasty: c. 320-550) as the “classical” or “golden” age of Indian Art, formulated during the early twentieth century. However, the selection is commendably wider in scope in terms of the range of dates and the variety of iconography (from a circa third century Buddhist sculpture, to a circa fifth century Jaina stele, to circa seventh century Hindu sculptures). Continue reading

4th International conference and dhamma yatra : *Ancient Buddhism * April 8-9, 2017 Lalitpur & Devgarah, India

Continue reading

CARC launches new Gandhara Connections project thanks to support of the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation

The Classical Art Research Centre at Oxford University has launched a new project to advance and support the understanding of ancient Gandharan art and its links with the Graeco-Roman world. The project has its origins in an exploratory workshop held by CARC in 2013. Thanks to the support of the Bagri Foundation and the Neil Kreitman Foundation, the Centre will now be able to hold international workshops and other public events over the next three years, to produce open access publications representing the latest thinking about Gandharan art, and to develop a variety of online resources for anyone interested in the subject. These will be available through a new microsite:
www.carc.ox.ac.uk/GandharaConnections

The Buddhist art of Gandhara, in what is now roughly northern Pakistan, has attracted intense interest since the nineteenth century, particularly because of its largely unexplained affinities with the the art of Greece and Roman, thousands of kilometers to the west, as well as other traditions of the Indian Subcontinent and the ‘Silk Road’ regions. The Gandhara Connections project will focus especially on this theme, as well as unresolved questions around the chronology and local geography of Gandharan sculpture.

You can follow us with Twitter or Facebook for further information about the project as it develops, and we shall be making periodic announcements to this email list.


Classical Art Research Centre, University of Oxford
http://www.carc.ox.ac.uk
Twitter: @CARC_Oxford @GandharaConnect
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CARC-Classical-Art-Research-Centre-1616456828604261/
https://www.facebook.com/Gandhara-Connections-318908468479778/?skip_nax_wizard=true

Articles Recently posted on Academia.edu

Of interest to our readers. – Buddhist Art News

“The Thousand-armed Mañjuśrī at Dunhuang and Paired Images in Buddhist Visual Culture.” Archives of Asian Art 66.1: 81-105
Michelle C. Wang

“A Fifteenth-Century Sino-Tibetan Buddha Hall at the Lu Family Tusi.” Archives of Asian Art 65, 1-2 (2015): 87-115
Aurelia Campbell

“Reflections on the origins of Mahāyāna”
Johannes Bronkhorst

“Painters, Patrons and Paintings of Patrons in Early Tibetan Art”
Dan Yerushalmi

“The Choice of Materials in Early Tibetan Printed Books”
Agnieszka Helman-Wazny

Recently posted on Academia.edu

Articles of interest to our readers:

Aurelia Campbell
“A Fifteenth-Century Sino-Tibetan Buddha Hall at the Lu Family Tusi.” Archives of Asian Art 65, 1-2 (2015): 87-115

Luca Maria Olivieri
THE GRAVEYARD AND THE BUDDHIST SHRINE AT SAIDU SHARIF I (SWAT, PAKISTAN): FRESH CHRONOLOGICAL AND STRATIGRAPHIC EVIDENCE

Michelle C. Wang
Bookmarked by Bernard Faure
(2016) “The Thousand-armed Mañjuśrī at Dunhuang and Paired Images in Buddhist Visual Culture.” Archives of Asian Art 66.1: 81-105