Secrets of Buddhist Art: Tibet, Japan, and Korea at Frist Center, 2017

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February 10–May 7, 2017
Secrets of Buddhist Art: Tibet, Japan, and Korea
Ingram Gallery

Tibet, Japan, and Korea all practice a form of esoteric or “secret” Buddhism. Called Vajrayana Buddhism, this form utilizes works of art that reveal a complex array of both human and divine figures. This exhibition showcases superlative works from the Newark Museum’s first-rate collection and will make its first appearance at the Frist Center, introducing a general audience to the dazzling aesthetics of Buddhist art and providing a basic understanding of these objects’ function within Buddhist practice.

This exhibition was organized by the Newark Museum.

Aizen Myo-o (King of Bright Passion) Zushi Shrine with Bishamonten (Guardian of the North), Fudo Myo-o (Immovable Protector), Juichimen Kannon (Bodhisattva of Compassion), the Monk Kukai, Japan, Edo Period (1603–1868). Wood, gold, colors, lacquer, wires, and metal fastenings. Newark Museum, Purchase 1909 George T. Rockwell Collection, 9.858

Aizen Myo-o (King of Bright Passion) Zushi Shrine with Bishamonten (Guardian of the North), Fudo Myo-o (Immovable Protector), Juichimen Kannon (Bodhisattva of Compassion), the Monk Kukai, Japan, Edo Period (1603–1868). Wood, gold, colors, lacquer, wires, and metal fastenings. Newark Museum, Purchase 1909 George T. Rockwell Collection, 9.858

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