TENSHO SHUBUN, CHINA AND JAPANESE ART: 15TH CENTURY ZEN BUDDHIST PRIEST

shubun33Modern Tokyo Times, July 12, 2014
Lee Jay Walker

Tensho Shubun was an important figure in Japanese art in the 15th century because several of his pupils would rise to major prominence. Of course, Tensho Shubun also left behind a rich legacy based on his own art therefore today he is highly regarded in Japan. This especially applies to the cultural angle because he played a powerful role in bridging the different generations and highlighting the richness of Chinese and Japanese culture in this period of history.

It is known that Tensho Shubun was born in the province of Omi in the late 13thcentury and died in the middle of the following century. Not surprisingly, the richness of Japanese Zen Buddhism and the splendor of Kyoto and Nara in Japan played a powerful role within his art. Likewise, the power of China on Japan in this period certainly emboldened Tensho Shubun. Therefore, it is widely credited to Tensho Shubun that he is the founding father of bringing suiboku ink painting to the fore in Japan based on the rich style of China where this form emanates. Continue reading

A New Generation of Chinese Art Visits Tampa and St. Petersburg

Lu Yang, Wrathful King Kong Core, video animation.

Lu Yang, Wrathful King Kong Core, video animation.

burnaway.org
By Lilly Wei on July 10, 2014

“My Generation,” critic, writer, curator and journalist Barbara Pollack’s expansive exhibition at the Tampa Museum of Art and the St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts (through September 28) salutes the next wave of contemporary Chinese artists, the post-Mao, post-Cultural Revolution generation, all born after 1976 and too young to be part of the tragic Tiananmen Square protests.

As China rapidly moved from an agrarian to a modern industrial society in the ’70s, startling changes took place that once again, radically altered Chinese lives. The exhibition emphasizes how much these artists’ attitudes differ from their predecessors (among the first to garner international acclaim). Pollack says that these artists emphatically avoid dragons, red lacquer, lanterns, pagodas, and other overly familiar, obsolete motifs, although some do refer to them, from a critical point of view—and critical, perhaps, of the audience that expects them. However, the most compelling aspect of the show is that these artists, engaged in a contemporary discourse, vividly tells us about China right now—one of the fastest developing countries in the world with sky high towers, multilevel roadways, and state of the art technologies—in language that is current and international. Todd Smith, the director of the Tampa Museum (soon to be the new director at the Orange County Museum in Newport Beach, California) said it was not at all what the majority of his viewers would expect, one reason he and Kent Lydecker, the director of the St. Petersburg MFA, invited “My Generation” to Florida. Continue reading

Artists from Japan, South Korea team up for Buddhist statue exhibition in Nara

A Miroku-bosatsu Buddhist statue is surrounded by toy deer in the Nara Prefectural Museum of Art in Nara. (Kazuto Tsukamoto)

A Miroku-bosatsu Buddhist statue is surrounded by toy deer in the Nara Prefectural Museum of Art in Nara. (Kazuto Tsukamoto)

Asahi-Shimbun
July 12, 2014

By KAZUTO TSUKAMOTO/ Staff Writer
NARA–A Japanese artist and his South Korean counterpart have joined forces to show how Buddhist culture was brought to Japan through the Korean Peninsula with a special exhibition featuring “Miroku-bosatsu” Buddhist statues.

The work of 53-year-old sculptor Takashi Kikuchi and artist Park Dong-ki, 47, is currently on display at the Nara Prefectural Museum of Art.

Kikuchi has held exhibitions of contemporary art and photos in Japan and South Korea after forming a group of artists from the two countries called “Forest-Beyond.”

Kikuchi carved three 1.3-meter-tall styrene figures and covered them with red, yellow and orange wool. Continue reading

‘Spread of Buddhism and Buddhist art across Asia with special reference to SE Asia’

‘Spread of Buddhism and Buddhist art across Asia with special reference to SE Asia’ a talk by Prof Sashibala at Auditorium, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA), 11, Mansingh Road

25th July 2014
Time : 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm Add to Calendar

Entry : Free (Seating on First-Come First-Served Basis)

Place : Auditorium, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA), 11, Mansingh Road, New Delhi – 110001
Venue Info : Events | About | Map
Metro : Nearest Metro Station – ‘Central Sectt.’ (Yellow Line and Violet Line)
Landmark : Entry Gate of IGNCA from Mansingh Road is opposite Raksha Bhavan

Event Description : ‘Spread of Buddhism and Buddhist art across Asia with special reference to SE Asia’ a talk by Prof Sashibala International Academy of Indian Culture/ National Museum institute, New Delhi.

A BUDDHIST NUN BECOMES ROLE MODEL FOR WOMEN EMPOWERMENT

Ani Choying Drolma. Photo by Geraldstiehler, Wikipedia Commons.

Ani Choying Drolma. Photo by Geraldstiehler, Wikipedia Commons.

JULY 13, 2014 IDN
By IDN

By Kalinga Seneviratne

By ordaining women into the Sangha (order of Buddha’s disciples), Gautama Buddha 2500 years ago has placed women on an equal footing with men in India. But today in most Asian Buddhist countries nuns are fighting an uphill battle to be recognized as credible teachers of the Dhamma (Buddha’s teachings). One Nepali woman may be unwittingly changing this perception by virtually singing the Dhamma.

“I never label myself into anything I just do what my heart wishes to do, with all the understanding and respect towards Buddha’s teachings and his principles,” said Nepali Buddhist nun Ani Choying Drolma, when I interviewed her just before she performed to a sellout audience at Singapore’s premier concert hall, The Esplanade in April.

Ani Choying Drolma, who has made a name for herself in the world music scene, has been performing to packed houses in recent years in countries such as the U.S., Australia, Taiwan and Singapore. In the process, she has made a lot of money, which she invests in a foundation she has set up in Nepal to educate poor women and empower them in a conservative male-dominated society. Continue reading

Hsi Lai Buddhist Temple holds music and arts festival

Sanrianha Cruz, a photographer from La Habra, takes pictures of the Hsi Lai Temples, during the Fo Guang Shan Hsi Temple Court Yard, Music and Art Festival, at the Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, CA., Saturday, June 21, 2014. (Photo by James Carbone for the San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

Sanrianha Cruz, a photographer from La Habra, takes pictures of the Hsi Lai Temples, during the Fo Guang Shan Hsi Temple Court Yard, Music and Art Festival, at the Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, CA., Saturday, June 21, 2014. (Photo by James Carbone for the San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

Sanrianha Cruz, a photographer from La Habra, takes pictures of the Hsi Lai Temples, during the Fo Guang Shan Hsi Temple Court Yard, Music and Art Festival, at the Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, CA., Saturday, June 21, 2014. (Photo by James Carbone for the San Gabriel Valley Tribune)
POSTED: 06/23/14, 8:05 PM PDT

The Hsi Lai Buddhist Temple is celebrating its 25th anniversary in Hacienda Heights.

One of the largest Buddhist monasteries in the Western hemisphere, the local temple is holding a yearlong celebration with special events and activities.

Over the weekend, the Hsi Lai Temple held its first music and art festival. Organizers lined up more than a dozen bands and artists for the family event.

The event was held in the temple courtyard at 3456 Glenmark Drive. The traditional Chinese mountain monastery is built adjacents to Hacienda Boulevard in the Puente Hills.

It is the American headquarters for one of Taiwan’s largest Buddhist organizations, Fo Guang Shan.

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‘Spread of Buddhism and Buddhist art across Asia (China & Central Asia)’

a talk by Prof Sampa Biswas at Auditorium, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA), 11, Mansingh Road
3:30pm to 4:30pm on 23rd July 2014

Entry : Free (Seating on First-Come First-Served Basis)
Place : Auditorium, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA), 11, Mansingh Road, New Delhi – 110001

Venue Info : Events | About | Map

Metro : Nearest Metro Station – ‘Central Sectt.’ (Yellow Line and Violet Line)

Landmark : Entry Gate of IGNCA from Mansingh Road is opposite Raksha Bhavan

Event Description : ‘Spread of Buddhism and Buddhist art across Asia (China & Central Asia)’ a talk by Prof Sampa Biswas NMI, National Museum.

[link]