Archaeologists Unearth Remains of Buddhist Stupa at Bhimeswara Temple

Bhimeswara Temple where the excavation was carried out at Chebrolu in Guntur district | EXPRESS PHOTO

Bhimeswara Temple where the excavation was carried out at Chebrolu in Guntur district | EXPRESS PHOTO

New Indian Express
By P Laxma Reddy

Published: 23rd August 2014 06:10 AM

VIJAYAWADA: In an important excavation executed by the Archaeology Department after finding a wall at Bhimeswara temple at Chebrolu village in Guntur district, the officials have unearthed six railing posts of the Buddhist Stupa and several other precious remains.

It may be recalled that the a brick alignment (wall) was unearthed on August 12 while digging on the southern side of the Bhimeswara Temple premises as a part of the temple renovation works taken up by the Archaeology Department. Following this, a team of officials of the Archaeology Department including assistant director K Chitti Babu, deputy executive engineer Koteswaran and technical assistant B Deepak Joe visited the place on August 16 and decided to explore the site further, anticipating some valuable remains there.

After the excavation, they have found the railing posts depicting Lotus Medallions and a row of animals. They also found a sculpture in which Bodhisattva is seen worshipped by a group of devotees, an image of a mystical animal and a ‘Yaksha’ on these posts.

“We have also found a sculpture in which the devotees are seen worshipping a Stupa by garlanding it, and large bricks (52 x 27 x 8cm size) at the site,” said Chitti Babu and added that an inscription of temple in Telugu-Kannada language has also been found. Continue reading

Buddhism and Art of Japan: Sengai Gibon and Sesshu Toyo in Opposite Directions

toyo5Modern Tokyo Times
August 21, 2014

Lee Jay Walker

Sesshu Toyo (1420-1506) and Sengai Gibon (1750-1837) are two famous individuals in Japanese history. However, despite belonging to the same Rinzai school of Buddhism both individuals had hugely different views of art and the faith they shared. Therefore, for Sengai Gibon he turned to art late in life after neglecting the hidden talents he clearly had because he wanted to focus on spirituality. Alternatively, Sesshu Toyo felt crushed at times by the rigid nature of Rinzai Buddhism during his lifetime.

Sengai Gibon also focused his art by turning away from depicting high culture and traditional forms. Instead his art highlighted humor but with a deeper message providing the individual shares the same mind concepts but of course the interpretation is left open for the individual to decide. Also, Sengai Gibon wanted to connect Rinzai Buddhism with all the people of Japan irrespective of status and light natured aspects of his art could reach a wider audience. Continue reading

Buddha bowl return request gets louder

The Telegraph
PIYUSH KUMAR TRIPATHI

Patna, Aug. 10: Strong voices are now being raised from the state to bring back the 400kg greenish-grey bowl kept at National Museum of Afghanistan in Kabul to Vaishali, which is being claimed to be its place of origin.

The bowl, considered to be one of the most revered relics in Buddhism across the globe, was supposedly used by Gautam Buddha as a “daanpatra” (alms bowl) during his stay in Vaishali.

Art, culture and youth affairs department minister Vinay Bihari said today that the state government would extend its support to the central government in establishing the provenance of the bowl in Vaishali.

Veteran RJD leader and former Vaishali MP Raghuvansh Prasad Singh has written a letter to chief minister Jitan Ram Manjhi, asking him to write to Prime Minister Narendra Modi to initiate steps to bring back the bowl.

The Telegraph yesterday reported that archaeologists have lately found strong evidences to prove that the bowl was made in the 6th century BC in Vaishali, and taken to Kandahar (then Gandhar) in Afghanistan by the first century Kushan emperor Kanishka. Continue reading

The Gyalwang Karmapa Inaugurates the Exhibition of Buddhist Bhoti and Islamic Calligraphy

2014.08.08-Calligraphy-From the Website of the Karmapa
2014.08.08 Calligraphy

8th August, 2014 – IIC New Delhi.

His Holiness the Gyawang Karmapa and Mr. Parvez Dewan, Secretary of the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India inaugurated an exhibition of Tibetan and Islamic Calligraphy to highlight creativity as the highest form of spirituality at the India International Centre, New Delhi.

An exhibition of Buddhist Bhoti and Islamic Calligraphy is being organised by the International Buddhist Confederation – IBC – in collaboration with the India International Centre in a bid to promote inter-faith understanding as its core agenda. They are also making an attempt to highlight the universal nature of basic goodness of all religions, interdependence and responsibilities.

The show, ‘Divinity in Syllables’, has brought together two calligraphers Jamyang Dorjee from Sikkim and Anis Siddiqui who have displayed their works.

Scholars and prominent guests from various fields attended the inauguration including Ven. Professor Samdhong Rinpoche, Chancellor, Sanchi University of Buddhist and Indic Studies; Maulana Dr. Mufti Mohd Mukarram Ahmed, Shahi Imam of Masjid Fatepuri, Members of National Commission for Minorities Prof. Farida Abdula Khan and Mr. T Namgyal Shanoo, and the Representative of the Dalai Lama in New Delhi, Kasur Tempa Tsering.

[link]

A divine blend of ancient wisdom for peace and union

The Hindu
August 16, 2014 08:16 IST
RANA SIDDIQUI ZAMAN

An exhibition of Buddhist Bhoti and Islamic Calligraphy is being organised by the International Buddhist Confederation – IBC – in collaboration with the India International Centre in a bid to promote inter-faith understanding as its core agenda. They are also making an attempt to highlight the universal nature of basic goodness of all religions, interdependence and responsibilities. The ongoing show at IIC Annexe concludes on August 18. According to Lama Lobzang, the Secretary General of the IBC, the coming together of Buddhist and Islamic calligraphy epitomises true repository of the ancient wisdom and message of the divine for the benefit of the mankind and all sentient beings. So, he said, the exhibition is a step towards initiating an understanding through a common artistic expression.

The show, ‘Divinity in Syllables’, has brought together two foremost calligraphers Jamyang Dorjee from Sikkim and Anis Siddiqui who have displayed their works. Anis Siddiqui represented some verses from the Quran on paper in artistic styles and multi-titled it “The Straight Way”. He also made strokes in colour for laymen to understand them.

Jamyang, a former Joint Secretary in the Government of Sikkim, who took voluntary retirement and took the art form to its zenith, has transformed simple, straight Buddhists chants and prayers into works of calligraphic art in which the figure of Buddha forms their core part. “I am tracing the development of Buddhism through calligraphy,” said Jamyang.

He is better known for producing the longest calligraphy scroll in 2012 measuring 163 m, which was written in Lapanese sumi ink on handmade Tibetan lokta paper. The scroll had 65,000 Tibetan characters written in different calligraphic styles. Continue reading

Buddhist relics found at Confucian academy

A gilded bronze vajra (top left) and a bell (top right) used in Buddhist rituals and presumed to be from the 12th century were found in a Confucian academy site in Dobong District, northern Seoul, the Cultural Heritage Administration said yesterday. A total of 77 artifacts were found. [NEWS1],[NEWSIS]

A gilded bronze vajra (top left) and a bell (top right) used in Buddhist rituals and presumed to be from the 12th century were found in a Confucian academy site in Dobong District, northern Seoul, the Cultural Heritage Administration said yesterday. A total of 77 artifacts were found. [NEWS1],[NEWSIS]

Korean JoongAng Daily
The artifacts could be from as early as the eighth century.

Aug 22,2014

A trove of Buddhist artifacts was unearthed on the site of a Confucian academy in Korea, the first discovery of its kind in the country.

The site in Dobong District, northern Seoul, was originally the site of a Buddhist temple called Yeongguk Temple.

The temple, whose construction date is uncertain, existed between Korea’s Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) and the early part of the subsequent Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Records say in 1573 a seowon – the Confucian institution that functioned as both an academy and a shrine – was built on the site, which was called Dobong Seowon.

Scholars say, therefore, the finding reflects one of Joseon’s governing policies: “Repress Buddhism and promote Confucianism.” Whereas during Goryeo, Buddhism was a state religion and Buddhist culture and art flourished, Joseon chose Confucianism as its state religion, leading to the decline of Buddhist culture and art. Continue reading

‘The All-Knowing Buddha': An Exhibition That Takes Us To The Heart Of Tibetan Meditation

o-RUBIN-570The Huffington Post | By Antonia Blumberg
Posted: 08/24/2014 10:29 am EDT Updated: 08/24/2014 10:59 am EDT Print Article

Tibetan Buddhist deity Sarvavid Vairocana, also referred to as the All-knowing Buddha, embodies a visualization practice that is said to lead meditators to enlightenment. Typically taught as an oral tradition by experienced teachers, the visualization practice comes alive this October in an exhibition of sacred Buddhist art at the Rubin Museum in New York City.

“The All-Knowing Buddha: A Secret Guide” is a collection of 54 paintings and accompanying sculptures that illustrate a step-by-step guide to the ritual process of visualization. The exhibition brings together Tibetan, Mongolian and Chinese works collected by a European missionary in Inner Mongolia during the turn of the 20th century.

The exhibition will be on view October 3, 2014–April 13, 2015 at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City. Continue reading